Commentary

Time for Some Hedging?

The economic calendar is extensive with a focus on housing and consumer behavior. Expect market participants to look for any sign that the economic recovery is stalling in the face of the COVID-19 surge and the slower pace of reopening.

Commentary

Don’t Look Back!

The economic calendar is modest, and many market participants will probably extend their long weekends. The ISM Non-Manufacturing Index and jobless claims data will be the most important.

Commentary

There are No Shortcuts!

The economic calendar is light with a focus on housing reports. These are becoming interesting again since we are getting a look at data that reflects the crisis effects. The reopening of the economy will continue as the leading story. What will be the safeguards in reopening businesses and the precautions taken by those venturing out?

Commentary

Roadblocks to Recovery

The economic calendar is a normal one and is beginning to include data from after the start of the crisis. This week includes small business and consumer sentiment surveys, as well as April data for retail sales and industrial production. I will also be watching jobless claims, both new and continuing.

Commentary

Are You Ready for Some High-Stakes Gambling?

It is a light economic calendar if measured by the number of reports but an important one given the focus on employment. We will get reports from ADP, the “official” BLS employment situation numbers, and the weekly early indicator from jobless claims. Whatever else happens in the economy, jobs take center stage.

Commentary

Should Investors Become Traders?

The economic calendar is packed with important reports. In normal times we would all be very interested, but the times are far from normal. Several of the reports emphasize April data, the first full impacts of the pandemic and shutdowns.

Commentary

Curb Your Enthusiasm

The economic calendar is light and provides little post-COVID19 data. Continuing jobless claims takes on a new importance, and we may get some useful information from the components of the University of Michigan sentiment survey.

Commentary

Good Questions but Poor Answers

The economic calendar includes several important releases, but few reflect the COVID19 effects. Everyone knows the economic news is dismal. Just how dismal does not seem to matter.

Commentary

Navigating the Maze of Models

Once again, no one cares about the economic calendar. There are a few items with recent data – jobless claims, mortgage applications, and Michigan sentiment – but most reports are old news. Everyone is focused on the increase in coronavirus cases and deaths. There are plenty of predictions, each based on model from a reputable source. The variation is wide.

Commentary

A Quest for Clarity

Once again, no one cares about the economic calendar. There have been big changes with more to come. While many claim to know what those changes will be, I see only speculation.

Commentary

A Pundit’s Paradise – Anyone Can Play

We have a full economic calendar. Only the FOMC decision will get major market attention. Initial jobless claims provide a post-virus look at the job market. Housing data remains interesting. Despite this, the media focus will remain on the coronavirus crisis.

Commentary

Why it is Crucial to Use the Right Time Frame

We have a modest economic calendar. Only two reports will provide any hint about the coronavirus economic impact. The punditry will not be hampered. Without meaningful data, speculation blossoms. There is one idea that could help both your interpretation of data and your investment decisions.

Commentary

Should Investors Heed the Message of the Markets?

We have a big economic calendar featuring employment news and the latest ISM survey. In normal times, observers would be parsing the data to adjust their economic and earnings expectations. Next week few will care. The market ignored last week’s reports and there is no reason to expect a change to “old news.”

Commentary

Investors Can Always Learn Something from Mr. Buffett

We have a big economic calendar including important data on consumer confidence, personal income and spending, and inflation. There will also be another round of housing news – two measures of prices, new home sales, and pending home sales. While it is not expected to change, the second estimate of Q4 GDP will be reported.

Commentary

Is It Time to Worry About Inflation?

The substantial economic calendar features inflation reports and housing, but also includes Michigan sentiment, the Fed’s Beige Book, and NFIB sentiment survey. We will also get the first earnings reports for the Q4 season.