The U.S. economy is growing at one of the fastest rates in the developed world right now, and unemployment hit a nearly 50-year low of 3.6 percent in April. Under normal circumstances, this should boost demand for domestic equities. Some investors, however, are hesitant to participate due to escalating trade tensions between the U.S. and China, among other factors. The latest fund flows report from Morningstar shows that investor appetite for equities has declined so far this year in favor of asset classes that are perceived to have less risk, including government and municipal bonds.

What’s more, economic data points to a slowdown in parts of Europe and Asia. The Eurozone Manufacturing PMI registered a six-year low of 47.5 in March, while China’s manufacturing sector is expanding only marginally.

This is expected to impact large U.S.-based multinationals that do a significant percentage of their business overseas. (In 2017, Intel topped the list with foreign sales accounting for 80 percent of total sales, followed by food and beverage maker Mondelez (76 percent) and Coca-Cola (70 percent).)

Many investors may wonder, then, how they can get access to the robust U.S. economy and strengthening dollar while limiting their exposure to shrinking global trade and a potentially slowing economy outside of the U.S.

world trade volume shrank in January 2019
click to enlarge

Time to Rotate Into Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Stocks?

A possible option could be small to mid-cap stocks, which are generally tied more closely to the domestic market than their blue-chip peers.

Not only are small and mid-caps more insulated from protectionist policies such as tariffs and stricter trade barriers, but they’re also supported by a stronger U.S. dollar. This week, the dollar tested its 52-week high, set in late April, and is currently trading above its 50-day and 200-day moving averages.

a strengthening U.S. dollar favors smaller, more domestic-focused companies
click to enlarge