I’M LEADING THIS NEWSLETTER WITH THIS BOOK

Because I believe it’s so valuable that every one of my readers needs to download a copy. Prepared by Josh Mungavin, my partner and one of the best young planners in the country, it’s an invaluable resource (and the price [$0] couldn’t be better).

Hope you enjoyed this issue, and I look forward to “seeing you” again in a couple months.

Family Info Organizer

The Family Information Organizer is here to help you navigate loss while also making sure you have everything you need in times of emergency or natural disaster. With this book, you will:
• be motivated to gather all your essential information now, rather than when it’s too late.
• have all your important information in one place.
• have peace of mind in times of loss or emergency.
• be able to make sure your family knows everything they need to when you’re not around.
• be able to share this fantastic tool with your friends and family.

Don’t be caught unprepared; use The Family Information Organizertoday!

Click here to download the book for free.

WHO KNEW?

Lubbock is home to six award-winning wineries, and the High Plains grows 90 percent of wine grapes in the state of Texas.

NOT GENERALLY ONE OF MY FAVORITE SOURCES

However, the Motley Fool piece on long-term care (sent to me by friend and LTC expert Bill Dyess) is quite useful.

Click here for Motley Fool article.

AN EXCELLENT ARTICLE

Morningstar columnist Mark Miller has written an informative article called “Safeguarding Your Wealth from the Effects of Cognitive Decline.” I must admit I’m a bit biased, because this was one of his tips:

Work with a fiduciary adviser. Avoid any financial adviser who is not a fiduciary—a legal definition that requires an adviser to put the best interest of a client ahead of all else. This point—and my argument for portfolio simplicity—is illustrated by an important story that appeared recently in the New York Times detailing abusive trading practices by a stock broker in the account of a couple well into their 80s that was being monitored by their daughter.

The fall of the Obama-era fiduciary rule for advisors may complicate the task of finding a trustworthy adviser. But there really is a simple way through the maze. If in doubt, ask anyone you are considering hiring to sign the fiduciary oath—a simple, legally enforceable contract created by the Committee for the Fiduciary Standard. By signing, the advisor promises to put the client’s interest first; to exercise skill, care and diligence; to not mislead you; and to avoid conflicts of interest. You can download the oath at by clicking here.