This year, commodity prices have been under pressure from a strong U.S. dollar and trade war fears. This has made a huge dent in the balance sheet of many net exporters of resources, in turn weakening their currencies. However, commodities could be on the rebound and are flashing a massive buy signal.

This should come as a shock to no one, but what most people don’t realize is just how closely some currencies track certain commodities. I have shared several charts that show this correlation over the years at numerous industry conferences. Attendees were always astounded when I got to these slides – and we’re talking professional economists, money managers and CEOs here.

With that said, I think it’s important that you see this correlation as well. Below are five world currencies that have been impacted by lower commodity prices.

1. Australian Dollar

Australia is the world’s top iron ore producer and exporter, with usable iron ore output of 880 metric tons in 2017. This means that its income is very sensitive to price changes. As demand from China, the world’s largest consumer of iron ore and top steel producer, has softened, so too has the Australian dollar.

Australian Dollar Tracks Iron Ore Prices
click to enlarge