Recently, Ryan Vlastelica penned a column suggesting investors should simply be “apathetic” when it comes to their money.

“Apathy doesn’t sound like a sensible investment philosophy, but it may be one of the most successful approaches a person can employ to grow wealth.”

Listen. I get it.

You can’t beat the market, so just “buy and hold.”

Over a long enough period, I agree, you will make money.

But, simply making money is not the point of investing.

We invest to ensure our current “hard earned savings” adjust over time to provide the same purchasing power parity in the future. If we “lose” capital along the way, we extend the time horizon required to reach our goals.

Crashes Matter A Lot

Ryan makes his case for “apathy” by quoting Barry Ritholtz who stated:

“If you don’t want to invest in equities because you fear a market crash, then you should never be in equities, because equities always crash.”

While Barry is absolutely correct in his statement, investing is never an “all or none” proposition. Being an investor is about understanding the “risk to reward” relationship of placing capital into the financial markets.

There is no “great investor” in history, not even Warren Buffett, who is apathetic about investing. It is also why every great investor has one simple rule in common:

“Buy low, Sell high.”