Ever since he made his presidential bid in June 2015, Donald Trump has vowed to “make America great again.” Part of that promise includes rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure, a monumental task that will require the financial backing of tax-free municipal bonds.

“We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals,” the president-elect told reporters the day after his historic victory. “We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none.”

To accomplish this, Trump has proposed a spending package as high as $1 trillion over the next 10 years. Although the private sector will be expected to finance a large portion of the work, massive amounts of public debt will be necessary.

This could be a “very big item for the muni market in the coming years,” according to John Vahey, managing director of federal policy for Bond Dealers of America, a trade association for fixed-income dealers.

Americans already appear eager to get started repairing their infrastructure, which is facing a $3.6 trillion shortfall, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

So far this year, state and local governments have issued nearly $150 billion in municipal bonds for new infrastructure projects, putting 2016 borrowing on a path to exceed levels in each of the last five years. And on Election Day, U.S. voters approved $55.7 billion in debt, the most since 2008.